Riverside CA News

How To Prevent & Treat Plantar Fasciitis

 

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We all know that exercise is good for us, but sometimes it can be challenging. There are the aches and pains that come with new activity, as well as unpleasant side effects of overexerting ourselves. Plantar fasciitis is one of those side effects—but that doesn’t mean you have to give up your walking, hiking, or other activities that strain your feet and legs. Instead, there are steps you can take to prevent plantar fasciitis from interfering with your workouts. If you already have plantar fasciitis and want to learn how to treat it without taking a break from exercise again, we’ve got some tips for you too. Read on to get all the details about this common condition and how you can get back on track before it interferes with your workout routine.

 

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the plantar fascia—the thick band of connective tissue that stretches from your heel along the arch of your foot. The plantar fascia supports the arch of your foot and is responsible for your ability to walk and stand on your toes. As you age, you can naturally experience some degeneration of this tissue and become more susceptible to plantar fasciitis. You can also be at a higher risk if you have other health issues that affect your feet. The most common symptom of plantar fasciitis is heel pain, which can become chronic if left untreated. This pain usually occurs when taking the first few steps in the morning, especially after long periods of rest (such as after a vacation or illness). The pain is often described by sufferers as a sharp or burning sensation, or like someone is standing on their heel with extreme pressure.

 

Symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis

If you’re experiencing pain in your heels, it could be a sign that you have plantar fasciitis. Other symptoms can include: - Tenderness in your soles - Your pain may be worse when you take your first steps after resting, such as after a night of sleep or a day off from work. - Heaviness or swelling in your feet - Swelling in your feet can be a sign that your plantar fascia is inflamed. - Pain when touching your heels - You may find that it’s painful to touch your heels or to step on a hard surface with your bare feet. - Pain on the inside of your foot - Your pain may extend from your heel to the inside of your foot.

 

6 Tips to Help Prevent Plantar Fasciitis

If you’re concerned about your risk of developing plantar fasciitis, there are steps you can take to prevent it from happening. Here are 6 tips for reducing your risk by using plantar fasciitis exercise: - Warm up before your workout. Warming up your muscles before exercise can help prevent injury. Take the time to stretch and then walk at a relaxed pace for 5-10 minutes before you start your workout. - Take breaks. You don’t have to exercise for hours at a time. Break up your workout into smaller sessions with rest periods in between. - Wear the right footwear. Make sure your shoes fit properly. This can feel like a no-brainer, but it’s important! If your shoes are too small, they put extra pressure on your foot and can cause injury. - Eat a healthy diet. A balanced diet filled with nutritious foods can help you stay healthy and prevent a number of health issues.

 

3 Exercises to Help Treat Plantar Fasciitis

If you’re already suffering from plantar fasciitis, you might have to ease off your workout routine for a bit. But don’t worry! There are some exercises you can do to help treat plantar fasciitis and ease your symptoms. Here are 3 exercises to help treat plantar fasciitis: - Heel stretching - Heel stretching can help stretch your plantar fascia and ease your pain and discomfort. You can do this exercise while sitting or standing, either on the floor or near a wall. - Calf stretching - Calf stretching can help relieve pain and pressure in your calves. You can do this exercise while sitting on a chair or standing against a wall. - Arch stretching - Arch stretching can reduce pain and swelling in your arches. You can do this exercise while standing near a wall.

 

Conclusion

We all know that exercise is good for us, but sometimes it can be challenging. There are the aches and pains that come with new activity, as well as unpleasant side effects of overexerting ourselves. Plantar fasciitis is one of those side effects—but that doesn’t mean you have to give up your walking, hiking, or other activities that strain your feet and legs. Instead, there are steps you can take to prevent plantar fasciitis from interfering with your workouts. If you already have plantar fasciitis, you can ease your pain and speed up your recovery with these exercises. Now you have no excuse not to get yourself back into the swing of things with these tips to keep your feet happy and healthy while you exercise!